Lisa Ijeoma

Growing up in a predominantly white environment, I was conditioned to adapt and become fluid in a rigid system that systematically suppressed half of my existence. I was the product of an interracial marriage, resulting in an inescapable and very unjust disadvantage in life, my skin color.
The disconnection with my skin and that of others made me search for representations in my close environment, the media and in art from an early age. After finishing my masters in fine arts, I felt the need for a broader spectrum of media to voice my experiences and began researching textiles.
By using the slow process of handsewn patchworks, heavier topics like racism, sexuality, trauma, the female experience, fear and abuse can find more space for their unfolding.
Drawing from experience, I try to explore my intersectional identity in a contemporary context and challenge the historical stereotyping, objectification and exploitation of the
colored body in the 21st century. My work contains historical contents, spirituality, storytelling and (post)modern notions of new media.

 

Delia

Delia

Usually they were black, or blue

Usually they were black, or blue

Lockjaw

Lockjaw

I'm so sorry, but not really

I'm so sorry, but not really

Untitled

Untitled